Sathya Sai Baba Deceptions Exposed

Exposing major deceits by guru Sathya Sai Baba in India, incl. murders cover-up & widely alleged sexual abuse

Reaction, reflection, resound – Sai Baba’s karmic doctrine

Posted by robertpriddy on February 4, 2014

All these things you see around you are your own reflections, as if in a mirror.” (Sai Baba, Summer Showers 1990, p. 118)

There are many things that we see hear and experience.  We think that it is the eyes that see, the ears that hear and the mind that experiences.  In fact, it is not so.  Everything is reaction, reflection and resound.” (Sai Baba, Sanathana Sarathi, April 2003, p.118)

Sai Baba ‘taught’ that the mind creates reality, and that everything we experience comes from within us, not any outer reality. This denies that there is an external world, a reality outside ourselves that impinges on the senses and goes to forming the human mind. This idea was developed by the sophists in early Greece, against which the classical philosophers who formed the root of European thought, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle and others argued most convincingly. Mainstream philosophy and science have overwhelmingly rejected this so-called ‘solipsist’ tenet as untenable. (‘solipsism’ derives from ‘solus ipse‘ or ‘only oneself’). One obvious reason is that it implies that no one else but oneself exists. That everything is created by our own individual mind, from within us (somewhere) – there being nothing whatever outside any of us – boils down to irrational fancy.

Sai Baba’s claim that whatever we see is a reflection of ourselves, and that whatever happens is a reaction to our own actions and so on is confused thinking. Working out its consequences for actual living very soon brings one up a maze of uncertainties, confusions and unsolvable dilemmas. This idea arose as part of metaphysical speculations about the nature of the cosmos as having a non-material origin (i.e. ‘the mind of God’). One had no science to speak of, so early mankind invented explanations of why things were as best they could. The entire body of these theological assumptions, extended and confabulated through millennia, form a labyrinth of complex arguments which can only be penetrated and deconstructed through diligent and very extended study. Few have the time or means to do so. None of it  has any basis that can be scientifically tested, not least a basic tenet – belief in a law of karma (action and reaction). The variants of karmic lore would explain how good and ill are the result of our own actions, which inevitably create reactions (sooner or later). It is promoted as a reassuring explanation that, eventually, justice is done through the workings of karma from one lifetime to another. Good acts produce benefits, bad acts get punished. However, since this is observable as not at all certain in real life, it required the belief in reincarnation of individual souls through many lifetimes to make it seem to work out. The same personality is supposed to be reincarnated in a new body at some time after death, and it carries with it a ‘karmic’ balance sheet (of good and bad actions) into the next incarnation, in which even the total environment is determined by the nature of the individual’s tendencies and ‘balance sheet’. The entire doctrine is untestable and relies on unproven assumptions about God and the cosmos.

Sai Baba ‘taught’ that the mind creates reality, and that everything we experience comes from within us, not any outer reality. This denies that there is an external world, a reality outside ourselves that impinges on the senses and goes to forming the human mind. This idea was developed by the sophists in early Greece, against which the classical philosophers who formed the root of European thought, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle and others argued most convincingly. Mainstream philosophy and science have overwhelmingly rejected this so-called ‘solipsist’ tenet as untenable. (‘solipsism’ derives from ‘solus ipse‘ or ‘only oneself’). One obvious reason is that it implies that no one else but oneself exists.

That the world is a figment of the human mind, a created fiction, is central to most Hindu-Vedantic theologies, giving rise to all manner of unworldly ideas and practices. It is a doctrine which is so unworldly that it cannot be put into any effective practice and, if taken seriously, leads to a denial of – and distortion of – most human relations and our interactions with the natural world. If adopted, there is nothing one can do by hope and pray for illumination as to the reality forever hidden behind the appearances given us by the senses.  (One can see the massive debilitating effects this resignation to ignorance of causality and religiously inculcated disbelief in the reality of the world and society has had on Indian life and society, both historically and today). The cause of this illusion (‘maya‘) is traditionally identified as God, who is supposedly resident within each person (in the heart, it is said – despite the fact now so well known, that the heart is nothing but a pump and all emotion arises in the brain).

Sathya Sai Baba used this ‘teaching’ not least to ensure that his devotees could be told that anything he said or did was really only their own subjective experience. In this way, lies he told and abuses he practiced were supposedly only the deluded perceptions of those who discovered them.  Many supplicants came to Sai Baba with all manner of problem, especially incurable illnesses . If they did not happen to get better or problems get solved, the doctrine pointed out that these were their own fault (in one way or another). Sai Baba tried, with much success among his indoctrinated followers, to  put himself beyond criticism in this way and helped him control their thoughts and actions.  Not only does the solipsistic argument brush aside any divine responsibility, but Sai Baba made clear that it applies to all natural events that happen too. The cause of  catastrophes like tsunamis, earthquake devastation etc. he put down entirely to our own actions. In 1993 he stated:- “The spiritual lapses of man account for these calamities.” (p. 342 Sathya Sai Speaks Volume 27)

Fallacies in doctrines of ‘karma’ (and healing)
The spiritual search for the ‘self’

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